Best Callaway Drivers of the Last 5 Years (Test & Review)

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Louis Pringle
Jun 06, 2024
8 minutes

Callaway is one of the most highly reputed brands in golf. They make up some of the best clubs in the world, whether you’re talking about their impressive line of irons, or their commitment to AI enhancements with their lines of woods and drivers. But for all the quality they offer, one question remains, which one is the best? More specifically, which Callaway driver is the best of them all? We tested the most recent Callaway drivers and have answers for you!

For those answer, we first headed over to the Golf Avenue Fulfillment Centre where we were able to pick the clubs that we will use for this test. More specifically, we picked 6 of the most recent Callaway drivers that were available in our inventory. We tested them on our Trackman-powered simulator and all club were tested using a Mitsubishi Tensei AV Blue shaft.

The 6 Callaway drivers we tested:

  1. Callaway Paradym Triple Diamond Driver (2023)
  2. Callaway Rogue ST Max Triple Diamond Driver (2022)
  3. Callaway Epic Max LS Driver (2021)
  4. Callaway Mavrik Sub Zero Driver (2020)
  5. Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero Driver (2019)
  6. Callaway Rogue Sub Zero Driver (2018)

Shop Callaway Drivers

1. Callaway Paradym Triple Diamond Driver (2023)

The most recent model in this list, last year’s release, the Callaway Paradym Triple Diamond driver. Of course, the expectations were a little higher for this one in terms of distance and forgiveness because of the recency of its release.

In terms of specs, the Callaway Paradym Triple Diamond driver combines a compact head for low spin and neutral flight, with a 360° Carbon Chassis for higher MOI and forgiveness. Advanced A.I. technologies enhance its speed and stability, making it an ideal choice for skilled golfers seeking distance and control.

Performance chart of the Paradym Triple Diamond Driver

A quick look at the chart above will support the short description we just provided you. The spin levels are below the 2,000-rpm mark, which is what you’d expect out of a low spin driver. In terms of ball speed, the Paradym came out on top at the end of the test, despite not getting the most swing speed, a testament to its explosiveness off the tee. The Paradym line of drivers is definitely not too shabby as the standard Paradym made it on our list of the 10 best drivers of the summer.

Lou’s takeaways after testing the Paradym Triple Diamond driver:

  • Tough to find the sweet spot at impact
  • Impressive forgiveness levels, considering it’s a high performance driver
  • Produces unmatched ball speeds

Good condition starting at $329.99

2. Callaway Rogue ST Max Triple Diamond Driver (2022)

The Callaway Rogue ST Max was released a year before the Paradym, and we’re also looking at the Triple Diamond variation of this model. Just like our previous model, the Triple Diamond is the designation given to Callaway lowest spinning models, so we should expect low spin levels here as well.

On the technical side, the Rogue ST Max Triple Diamond driver is designed for skilled players, offering lower launch angles and spin levels with a compact 450cc head. It boasts a Tungsten Speed Cartridge for optimal weight distribution, enhancing MOI for greater forgiveness. The driver's ball shape and construction make it a top choice for golfers seeking precision and a penetrating ball flight. Ideal for golfers looking to find more fairways off the tee.

Performance chart of the Rogue ST Max Triple Diamond Driver

There are some stats that quickly stand out when you look at the performance chart of the Rogue ST Max driver. Right away, spin rates are above the 2,000-rpm mark, which is the threshold I personally use to identify the quality of low spinning drivers.

Aside from the spin rates, the rest of the Rogue ST Max fell right in the sweet spots that we were aiming for with this test. If low spin rates are not your thing but you’re looking for a forgiving option off the tee, the basic variation of the Rogue ST Max is good it managed to appear in our list of the 10 most forgiving drivers of 2024.

Lou’s takeaways after testing the Rogue ST Max Triple Diamond driver:

  • Strong draw-bias that almost eliminates the right side of the course (left side for lefties)
  • Slightly higher spin rates than most low-spin models
  • Terrific forgiveness on mishits, especially for a low-spin model

Good condition starting at $233.97

3. Callaway Epic Max LS Driver (2021)

The Callaway Epic Max LS driver is actually a personal favorite of mine as it was my gamer no later than last summer! I knew exactly what to expect from this club in terms of feel and ball flights, but what I was interested in seeing is how its numbers would stack up against the other models in this test.

This driver is a standout choice for golfers seeking a blend of distance and forgiveness with a low spin profile. It features a larger footprint for increased forgiveness and a deeper face to promote consistent ball speeds across a wider area. The driver's advanced materials and Jailbreak Frame technology provide horizontal stability, ensuring a powerful and accurate performance off the tee.

Performance chart of the Epic Max LS Driver

The Epic Max LS manages to sneak in just below the 2,000-rpm mark in terms of spin rates, which is what we were looking for. On the other hand, carry distance is the shortest one we’ve seen from our drivers so far, which is a bit disappointing, but the feel for the ball at impact, especially on mishits, is terrific, and even, surprisingly good for a low spin model. So good, in fact, it was featured in our list of the best drivers under $300.

Lou’s takeaways after testing the Epic Max LS driver:

  • Unmatched feel for the ball at impact
  • Great feedback on strike quality through vibrations in the shaft
  • Delivers impressive forgiveness levels for a low-spin model

Good condition starting at $219.99

4. Callaway Mavrik Sub Zero Driver (2020)

Callaway’s 2020 release was the Mavrik line of drivers. They instantly became the talk of the equipment world thanks to its unique orange profile. Aside from its standout look, the Mavrik’s performance also had golfers talking. Let’s a take a closer look at why that was.

Taking a close look at its build, the Callaway Mavrik Sub Zero driver is engineered for advanced golfers seeking low spin and high MOI. It features a streamlined 450cc head, Flash Face SS20 for increased ball speed, and FS2S Titanium for a lighter build. With adjustable weights for launch and spin customization, it's a driver designed for precision and adaptability.

Performance chart of the Mavrik Sub Zero Driver

Performance-wise, the Mavrik Sub Zero was probably the most disappointing one of the bunch we tested. While it barely breaks it, the Mavrik didn’t manage to stay below the 2,000-rpm mark, which a bit underwhelming. Additionally, the Mavrik produces the shortest drives on average, both in terms of carry and total distance. Despite its struggle during this test, it still managed to loge itself in our list of the best Callaway drivers under $250.

Lou’s takeaways after testing the Mavrik Sub Zero driver:

  • Take out the far side when hitting it off the tee (almost takes out fades and slice)
  • Excellent feel for the ball impact, easy to locate contact spot through vibrations
  • Data from the test suggests you could get more out of this driver with the right adjustments

Good condition starting at $179.99

5. Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero Driver (2019)

The Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero driver is a 5-year-old model that packs quite the punch as we’re about to see. Usually, we recommend that you upgrade your driver around the 5-year mark, but if any of you guys at home are looking for a low spin option at low costs, the Epic Flash Sub Zero should be at the top of your list and here why!

To put it simply, the Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero driver is a high-performance club that's perfect for golfers looking to reduce spin and maximize distance. It features a new Flash Face technology for increased ball speed, along with adjustable perimeter weighting to fine-tune shot shape. This driver offers a unique combination of low spin and high MOI, making it a favorite among players who want both distance and forgiveness.

Performance chart of the Epic Flash Sub Zero Driver

The description above becomes extremely accurate when you look at the performance chart of the Epic Flash Sub Zero. The Sub Zero produces by far the lowest spin rates of all the drivers in this test, which certainly helped with the rollout of the ball once it hits the ground. On top of having the lowest spin level, the Epic Flash Sub Zero produces the longest distance both in terms of carry and total yardage. Truly outstanding numbers from a 5-year-old golf club.

Lou’s takeaways after testing the Epic Flash Sub Zero driver:

  • Incredible power time and time again
  • Unmatched low-spinning rates at impact
  • The lower spin rates limited the tendencies of hitting a slice off the tee

Good condition starting at $184.99

6. Callaway Rogue Sub Zero Driver (2018)

Last but not least, the Callaway Rogue Sub Zero is the oldest driver we tested for this comparison experiment, and let’s just say that we weren’t expecting the results we got with this driver. The Rogue’s performance, combined with the results of the Epic Flash Sub Zero, really makes you think about the necessity of spending all your money on the latest models on the market. But let’s find out why exactly.

Upon its release, the Callaway Rogue Sub Zero driver was rated as a tour-level club, engineered for extremely low spin and high MOI. This makes it a suitable option for both professionals and amateurs seeking lower spin rates. Its advanced design features a compact head shape and altered weighting to deliver lower spin, while the inclusion of Jailbreak and VFT technologies ensures maximum ball speed and forgiveness.

Performance chart of the Rogue Sub Zero Driver

There’s no doubt that the Rogue Sub Zero was designed for speed off the tee as I managed to post my fastest swing speeds with this driver. However, it needs to be said that it was edged out by the Paradym in the ball speed department, a testament to the power packed in the Paradym’s club face. Back to the Rogue Sub Zero, it performed admirably in all statistical departments, especially with swing speed and spin rates.

Lou’s takeaways after testing the Rogue Sub Zero driver:

  • Surprising levels of forgiveness for an older model
  • Incredible feel throughout the swing, helped me maximize my swing speed
  • Still holds up against the latest models on the market performance-wise

Shop the Callaway Rogue Sub Zero Driver

Overall Comparison

After looking at the individual performance of our clubs, its time for a more complete look at their overall performance by putting their performance side-by-side and highlighting the outstanding data.

Overall performance chart of all the Callaway drivers we tested.

There are few things that jump out right off the bat when you look at the chart above.

First off, the distance discrepancy between the longest and the shortest driver is minimal as only 5 yards separate the Epic Flash Sub Zero and the Mavrik Sub Zero.

Second, the Epic Flash Sub Zero also takes the crown in the spin rates column. With Triple Diamond, LS, and Sub Zero variation being used for this tested, we expected low spin rates, but the Epic Flash Sub Zero managed to distance clearly distance itself from the pack.

Third, the Rogue Sub Zero clearly got the best club speeds of this test, but the Paradym Triple Diamond showed its powerful might by outranking the rest of the clubs in this test in the ball speed department. The Paradym’s club face didn’t necessarily get the most powerful swings, but the ball was clearly exploding off it.

Honorable mention to the Mavrik Sub Zero for its impressive ball speed average considering it got the worst club speeds of all the drivers in this test. While this ball speed didn’t translate to longer strikes for the Maverik, it did benefit from the longest roll out from all the clubs in this test. Speaking of roll out and distances, let’s take a closer look at the proper rankings.

Distance Comparison

Looking at the total and carry distance charts below, you’ll quickly notice the Epic Flash’s slight edge over the Paradym Triple Diamond in both charts. A staggering feat for a 5-year-old driver. Even more impressive considering it got the second lowest ball speed of all the clubs in this test. There’s no doubt that its low spin rates, the lowest of the test, contributed to this length.




Carry distance chart of all the Callaway drivers we tested.

Total distance chart of all the Callaway drivers we tested.

The most eye-catching thing of all when looking at the charts above is the tight discrepancy between the longest and the shortest drivers. This is extremely interesting considering that top brands, like Callaway, love to advertise the gain in yardage with their newer models.

There’s no denying that we’d all take an extra 5 yards off the tee time and time again, but the question you need to ask yourself is, “Is this extra yardage really worth the extra $200 or even $300 you’ll have to spend for the newest models?”.

Also, the fact remains that the longest driver of this test, the Epic Flash Sub Zero, which was also the lowest spinning one, is a 5-year-old driver and you can get your hands on it at less than half the price of Callaway’s latest model.

Spin Rates Comparison

We’ve touched upon spin rates a few times already in this article and for a good reason because they were going to be a key focus from the start of this test since we were testing low spin models. The chart below shows the complete spin rates rankings.

Spin rates chart of all the Callaway drivers we tested.

While we’ve praised the top drivers plenty already, let’s pay close attention to the drivers at the bottom of this list and see why they couldn’t break the 2,000-rpm threshold. The drivers in question are the Rogue ST Max Triple Diamond and the Mavrik Sub Zero.

Let’s first look at the Rogue ST Max’s spin rates. It shows the highest spin rates of all, but that’s not entirely surprising considering the Rogue ST Max line of clubs was designed to optimize launch conditions at impact. This higher spin rates are also the most likely explanation as to why the Rogue ST Max ranks in the lower half of the distance charts.

Also keep in mind that faster swing speeds are likely to produce an even greater discrepancy between the drivers included in this test. Additionally, these fast-swinging players should strongly prioritize their spin rates considering this could end up in a loss of yardage.

Now that we’ve covered the overall comparison, as well as the distance and spin rates comparison, its time to examine the performance of our oldest driver, the Rogue Sub Zero and compare it to the Paradym Triple Diamond.

Paradym Triple Diamond vs. Rogue Sub Zero – Head-to-head Comparison

When taking a closer look at chart below, we clearly see that the difference in performance between the Rogue and the Paradym is negligible at best. The Rogue posted the higher club speeds, but the Paradym’s hot club face made gave it the slight edge in terms of ball speeds and distance.

Performance chart comparison between the Paradym Triple Diamond and the Rogue Sub Zero.

What’s truly interesting here is that when you consider that there are 5 years of innovation between those two golf clubs, the gap in performance is not massive at all. In other words, it is valid for golfers to wonder if spending an extra $200 or $300 is worth it when it comes to the performance of your driver.

Summary

Now that we’ve reached the end of our test, let’s summarize the main takeaways that you should have from this experiment.

    1. It’s quite obvious that the Epic Flash had the best performance of all the drivers we tested, but the discrepancy in performance is negligible, meaning that you can’t really go wrong with any of these drivers. It’s more of a budget question at this point.
    2. Additionally, the data from this test indicates that older drivers (from 5 or 6 years) don’t have too much to envy to the newer models on the market when it comes to on course performance. So, no need to spend the big bucks on your next driver. Find one that you like, at your budget, and it will provide you with all you need on the course.
    3. On the other hand, highly skilled players, or golfers with fast swing speeds looking to push their limits might want to consider the latest models on the market. The innovations packed in these new models should support them in their quest of pushing the boundaries of the game.

Shop Callaway Drivers Under $200

We hope this test help you better understand which Callaway driver is the best and, more importantly, which is one is the best for you. Additionally, the results from this test should also help you realize that relatively recent used golf club models can match the performance of brand-new ones when it comes to most golfers.

If you need any more help to find the right Callaway driver, or any driver for that matter, you can always book a call with one of our expert caddies. They’ll provide you with personalized recommendations based on your needs and desires on the golf course.

Finally, if you don’t feel like having a chat and prefer to make your own research, you can always check out our Club Finder tool. Answer a few quick questions and our Club Finder tool will generate a selection of drivers based on your answers to its questions.

Until next time,

The Golf Avenue Team

Further reading

Looking for a Callaway Driver on a budget? Here's our picks for the best affordable drivers by our in-house expert Nick, for high, mid and low handicap.

Find our top picks for the top 6 best golf drivers from Cobra since 2012. We reviewed each club year by year to see how older models still hold up.